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~24 inches27 inches~32 inches34 inches

Dell Alienware AW2521HF (24.5″ 240Hz IPS, 1920 x 1080)

 
Dell Alienware AW2521HF

Dell Alienware AW2521HF

 
Good for:

  • High frame rate competitive PC gaming
  • A bit of casual gaming on the side
  • 120Hz console gaming on the Xbox Series X (no VRR)
  • General desktop usage including video content
  • Colour-critical work within sRGB colour space (profiling advised)


Panel used:

AUO M250HAN01.3 (24.5″ AHVA IPS-type, 48-240Hz variable with Adaptive-Sync).

Screen surface:

Medium matte anti-glare, good glare handling without ‘heavy’ or ‘smeary’ graininess.

Additional specifications:

  • 1920 x 1080 (Full HD) resolution
  • PWM-free (flicker-free) WLED backlight (~sRGB colour gamut)
  • 1ms grey to grey response time
  • DP 1.2a, 2 HDMI 2.0 ports, 4 USB 3.0 ports, 3.5mm headphone jack, 3.5mm audio line-in
  • Screen is fully adjustable with 100mm VESA support


Why choose this monitor:

The Dell Alienware AW2521HF combines high speed with pleasing colour quality. The monitor delivers a rich and natural image with excellent consistency and shade variety, from its IPS-type panel. With a little extension beyond sRGB in the colour gamut, it offers a lick of extra vibrancy without strong oversaturation. The contrast is much in-line with expectations for the panel – passable but not the main strength. It offers respectable pixel responsiveness, fast with little to no overshoot at high refresh rates. And it has low input lag to help deliver a strong ‘connected feel’. Adaptive-Sync is also supported including AMD FreeSync and Nvidia’s ‘G-SYNC Compatible Mode’, getting rid of tearing and stuttering from frame and refresh rate mismatches. With this and the respectable pixel response tuning across the range, the monitor makes good use of a broad range of refresh rates and makes frame rate dips more palatable.

The monitor also offers a ‘ComfortView’ Low Blue Light (LBL) setting, although this proved ineffective on the unit we tested. The easily accessible and fully customisable presets made it easy to create our own effective LBL setting instead, however. This flexibility can also be nice if you like to use different sets of settings for different games or other applications and quickly switch between them. The monitor offers creative but in our view tasteful styling, like a prop from a sci-fi film. ‘AlienFX’ RGB LED lighting is included for some customisation opportunity as well, whilst the monitor offers full ergonomic flexibility. So certainly not a style over substance approach. The monitor doesn’t offer a strobe backlight setting, but it’s competitively priced in the segment and offers a nice mix of speed and image quality – with attractive styling on top.

Further reading:

Our review

Manufacturer product page

Acer XB253Q GP (24.5″ 144Hz IPS, 1920 x 1080)

 
Acer XB253Q GP

Acer XB253Q GP

 
Good for:

  • PC gaming
  • 120Hz console gaming on the Xbox Series X (no VRR)
  • General desktop usage including video content
  • Colour-critical work within sRGB colour space (profiling advised)


Panel used:

AUO M250HAN01.3 (24.5″ AHVA IPS-type, 48-144Hz variable with Adaptive-Sync).

Screen surface:

Medium matte anti-glare, good glare handling without ‘heavy’ or ‘smeary’ graininess.

Additional specifications:

  • 1920 x 1080 (Full HD) resolution
  • PWM-free (flicker-free) WLED backlight (~sRGB colour gamut)
  • 2ms grey to grey response time
  • 2 HDMI 2.0 ports, DP 1.4, 4 USB 3.0 ports (plus upstream), 3.5mm headphone jack
  • Screen is fully adjustable with 100mm VESA support. 2 x 2W speakers are included


Why choose this monitor:

The Acer XB253Q GP provides a rich and natural image, with strong colour consistency and a good varied look. The colour gamut extends a little beyond sRGB, for a slight bit of extra vibrancy – but nothing extreme, avoiding the oversaturated look associated with wide gamut models. An effective sRGB emulation setting is included if you wish to restrict things so they sit even closer to the sRGB colour space. The monitor provides a reasonable contrast experience, better than some IPS-type models and slightly exceeding the specified 1000:1. But with the usual IPS-type characteristic of ‘IPS glow’. The responsiveness is strong, particularly impressive for the panel type. It provides an experience that many will feel is highly competitive with 144Hz TN models, with snappy pixel responses overall and low input lag. Adaptive-Sync is supported, allowing AMD FreeSync and Nvidia’s ‘G-SYNC Compatible Mode’ to be used.

As an alternative to Adaptive-Sync, a strobe backlight mode called VRB (Visual Response Boost) can be used to minimise perceived blur. This worked very effectively to minimise perceived blur without strong strobe crosstalk in the centre of the screen. The monitor includes a flicker-free backlight and a range of effective Low Blue Light (LBL) settings to enhance viewing comfort. The monitor is VESA DisplayHDR 400 certified, but only provides a very basic HDR experience and falls short of what’s required for a true HDR experience. A wider colour gamut and effective local dimming, for example. The monitor offers quite a solid construction and full ergonomic flexibility, with a premium feel to the sturdy powder-coated metal stand. Note that 120Hz may not work reliably on the PS5 due to how refresh rates are organised on this model. Further details in this post, which covers a PS5 120Hz-capable alternative – the BenQ EX2510.

Further reading:

Our review

A comparison with some competing models using a 23.8″ Panda IPS-type panel.

A comparison with the BenQ EX2510.

Manufacturer product page

BenQ EX2780Q (27″ 144Hz IPS, 2560 x 1440)

 
BenQ EX2780Q

BenQ EX2780Q

 
Good for:

  • Casual PC gaming (also used by some competitively)
  • Console gaming on 1440p 120Hz-capable consoles such as Xbox Series X
  • Console gaming on PS5 (1080p @120Hz or ‘4K’ UHD @60Hz via downsampling)
  • General desktop usage including multi-tasking
  • Colour-critical work within sRGB and DCI-P3 colour spaces (profiling advised)


Panel used:

Innolux M270KCJ—K7B AAS (27″ AAS IPS-type, 144Hz with Adaptive-Sync).

Screen surface:

Light matte anti-glare, good preservation of vibrancy and clarity with decent glare handling.

Additional specifications:

  • 2560 x 1440 (WQHD) resolution
  • PWM-free (flicker-free) WLED backlight (~DCI-P3 colour gamut)
  • 5ms grey to grey response time
  • DP 1.4, 2 HDMI 2.0 ports, USB-C (DP Alt Mode and 10W PD), 3.5mm headphone jack
  • Screen is tilt only with 100 x 100mm VESA support. 2 x 2W stereo speakers plus 5W integrated subwoofer included


Why choose this monitor:

The BenQ EX2780Q features an IPS-type panel with WQHD resolution (2560 x 1440). The flicker-free enhanced phosphor WLED backlight offers a generous colour gamut. Combined with the IPS panel, this breaths life into games and the desktop with good vibrancy plus excellent shade variety and consistency. A light matte anti-glare screen surface complements this, keeping brighter elements free from strong graininess and preserving vibrancy better than ‘stronger’ matte surfaces. The monitor provides a fairly unique look, which we feel looks more subtle and less distinctive than it appears in most images. The bottom bezel is a key feature from the front, with a reddish brown speaker-grille covering integrated stereo speakers. An accompanying subwoofer is located at the rear, ensuring a fuller and more bass-rich sound output than most integrated monitor speakers.

The monitor offers a competent 144Hz performance overall, with low input lag and well-tuned pixel overdrive to get the most out of the panel. Adaptive-Sync is supported, including AMD FreeSync and Nvidia’s ‘G-SYNC Compatible Mode’ – with both technologies working as intended to remove tearing and stuttering from frame and refresh rate mismatches. The monitor also offers basic HDR support (VESA DisplayHDR 400), putting the colour gamut to good use alongside the use of 10-bit colour processing for a more natural look, vibrancy where intended and a nuanced shade variety. This is only basic HDR support, though, without any contrast advantage or local dimming and a relatively limited peak luminance by HDR standards. Easily accessible Low Blue Light (LBL) settings are also included, alongside an IR remote for intuitive control of the OSD.

Further reading:

Our review. Note that our ‘recommended badge’ was not awarded simply due to high pricing at time of review – price is now more competitive.

Some thoughts on how this model compares to competing models using LG Nano IPS panels.

A thread looking at some alternatives.

Manufacturer product page

ASUS PA278QV (27″ 75Hz IPS, 2560 x 1440)

 
ASUS PA278QV

ASUS PA278QV

 
Good for:

  • General desktop usage including multi-tasking
  • Photography, design and other colour-critical work within sRGB colour space (profiling advised)
  • Casual gaming (75Hz max refresh rate)


Panel used:

Innolux M270KCJ-L5B (27” IPS-type, 48-75Hz variable with Adaptive-Sync).

Screen surface:

Light matte anti-glare, respectable glare handling with fairly direct light emission and no clear graininess.

Additional specifications:

  • 2560 x 1440 resolution
  • ~20kHz PWM (‘flicker-free’) WLED backlight (sRGB+ colour gamut)
  • 5ms grey to grey response time
  • DP 1.2a, MiniDP 1.2a, HDMI 1.4, Dual-link DVI, 4 USB 3.0 ports (plus upstream), 3.5mm headphone jack and 3.5mm microphone jack
  • The stand is fully adjustable with 100mm VESA support included for alternative mounting


Why choose this monitor:

The ASUS PA278QV offers a smart home-office appearance with excellent ergonomic flexibility. The 27″ screen and 2560 x 1440 resolution provides a good pixel density, giving a good level of detail, clarity and work space for various tasks. The well-calibrated IPS-type panel delivers an excellent range of rich and natural-looking colours, with comprehensive sRGB colour gamut coverage and strong colour consistency. The colour credentials make this a capable monitor for both work and play. Including photography, video editing or design work within the sRGB colour space. As usual, profiling with your own colorimeter or spectrophotometer will yield the best results here. The backlight is ‘flicker-free’, whilst there are Low Blue Light (LBL) settings designed to enhance viewing comfort. This is particularly useful in the evening, where exposure to blue light should be minimised to aid a restful night’s sleep.

The monitor provides good 75Hz responsiveness, too, with fairly low input lag and well-tuned pixel responses plus good pixel overdrive flexibility. Adaptive-Sync is supported, combating tearing and stuttering for both AMD (FreeSync) and Nvidia (‘G-SYNC Compatible Mode’) GPU users. The monitor provides a strong all-round performance in a fairly solidly-built and feature-rich package. This is coupled with a very agreeable price, making it an attractive 75Hz WQHD proposition. If you like the sound of this model but would find a USB-C port useful, consider the PA278CV which uses the same panel and performs similarly in many respects.

Further reading:

Our review

A thread focusing on this model for photo editing and gaming

A comparison with the Dell U2719D

Manufacturer product page

AOC CQ27G2(U) (27″ 144Hz curved VA, 2560 x 1440)

 
AOC CQ27G2(U)

AOC CQ27G2(U)

 
Good for:

  • General desktop usage including multi-tasking
  • Movie watching
  • Casual PC gaming
  • Console gaming on 1440p 120Hz-capable consoles such as Xbox Series X


Panel used:

TPV TPM270WQ1-DP02 (27″ curved Samsung SVA, 48 – 144Hz variable with Adaptive-Sync).

Screen surface:

Light matte anti-glare, good glare handling with decent vibrancy and clarity preservation.

Additional specifications:

  • 2560 x 1440 (WQHD) resolution
  • PWM-free (flicker-free) WLED backlight (sRGB+ colour gamut)
  • 1ms MPRT response time
  • 2 HDMI 2.0 ports, DP 1.2a, 3.5mm headphone jack. ‘U’ model includes 4 USB 3.0 ports (plus upstream)
  • Screen offers tilt, height and swivel functionality – 100 x 100mm VESA supported. ‘U’ model includes integrated 2 x 2W speakers


Why choose this monitor:

The CQ27G2(U) combines the good pixel density and desktop real-estate advantages of the 2560 x 1440 (WQHD) resolution with a high-contrast VA panel. The significantly stronger static contrast than competing panel types aids the ‘atmosphere’ for dark areas in games and movies and provides a deeper look to darker shades in comparison. A flicker-free WLED backlight is included to aid viewing comfort, alongside effective Low Blue Light (LBL) settings. A colour gamut of 92% DCI-P3 (recorded) means there’s some extension beyond sRGB for a touch of extra saturation and vibrancy, but nothing extreme. We find the curved screen quite agreeable and we certainly wouldn’t be put off the curve or judge that aspect from images or videos of the monitor.

The monitor provides decent overall responsiveness, with low input lag and a 144Hz refresh rate. As usual for a VA model there are some weaknesses for some pixel transitions, leading to some powdery and in places ‘smeary’ trailing. But we’ve certainly seen a worse performance from this panel type and this is a key weakness of VA technology. The high refresh rate still delivers a reduction in perceived blur and good ‘connected feel’ at suitably high frame rates. Adaptive-Sync is also supported, including AMD FreeSync and Nvidia’s ‘G-SYNC Compatible Mode’. The model is officially certified as ‘G-SYNC Compatible’, although some issues including flickering and ‘screen blanking’ were observed for some double-digit refresh rates when using the technology on our GTX 10 series GPU. Newer Nvidia GPUs provide a smoother experience in that respect. Either way, this model offers a pleasing all-round performance at a highly competitive price.

Further reading:

Our review

Manufacturer product page

A thread looking at some competing models and documenting some of our thoughts during and after the review process

Philips 276E8VJSB (27″ 60Hz IPS, 3840 x 2160)

 
Philips 276E8VJSB

Philips 276E8VJSB

 
Good for:

  • General desktop usage including multi-tasking
  • High resolution image editing and movie watching
  • Other colour-critical work within sRGB colour space (profiling advised for best results)
  • High resolution casual PC gaming (60Hz max refresh rate, no VRR)
  • Console gaming on 4K-capable consoles such as Xbox Series X and PS5


Panel used:

Panda LM270PF1L (27” IPS-type, 60Hz).

Screen surface:

Light matte anti-glare, providing decent glare handling whilst preserving clarity and vibrancy potential.

Additional specifications:

  • 3840 x 2160 (‘4K’ UHD) resolution
  • PWM-free (flicker-free) WLED backlight (sRGB+ colour gamut)
  • 5ms grey to grey response time
  • 2 HDMI 2.0 ports, DP 1.2, 3.5mm audio output
  • Screen is tilt-only


Why choose this monitor:

The Philips 276E8VJSB has a homely appearance with a crescent-shaped powder-coated metal stand and slim dual-stage bezels. The image performance is very solid overall, with a 3840 x 2160 (‘4K’ UHD) resolution spread across a 27″ area for a tight 163.18 PPI (Pixels Per Inch). The panel is nicely calibrated with good gamma handling and good flexibility in the OSD to adjust this according to preferences. Some extension beyond the sRGB colour space invites a bit of extra vibrancy, without intense oversaturation. An effective sRGB emulation setting is also included, which restricts the colour gamut very well. This makes the monitor suitable for a plethora of uses, including general usage and gaming with rich and varied colour output. And also image editing purposes.

The monitor offers a flexible pixel overdrive solution, well-tuned to reduce perceived blur to levels that are about as low as you’ll see on a 60Hz monitor. Input lag is also nice and low. This model does not offer any FreeSync capability. If this (or greater stand adjustability) is important then consider the likes of the LG 27UK650 or 27UL650 and related models as alternatives. For overall image quality and value for money, though, this model is an excellent choice. The Philips 278E1A is also worth considering – it includes a different design with VESA mounting and integrated speakers, but is otherwise similar to this model.

Further reading:

Our review

Manufacturer product page

BenQ EX2710 (27″ 144Hz IPS, 1920 x 1080)

 
BenQ EX2710

BenQ EX2710

 
Good for:

  • PC gaming
  • 120Hz console gaming on capable consoles such as PS5 and Xbox Series X
  • General desktop usage including video content
  • Colour-critical work within sRGB colour space (profiling advised)


Panel used:

AUO M270HAN03.2 (27″ AHVA IPS-type, 48-144Hz variable with Adaptive-Sync).

Screen surface:

Light matte anti-glare. Respectable glare handling with good preservation of vibrancy and no obvious graininess

Additional specifications:

  • 1920 x 1080 (Full HD) resolution
  • PWM-free (flicker-free) WLED backlight (~sRGB colour gamut)
  • 1ms grey to grey response time
  • 2 HDMI 2.0 ports, DP 1.2a+ (HDR feature set), 3.5mm headphone jack
  • Screen offers tilt, height and swivel adjustment with 100mm VESA support. Integrated 2 x 2.5W speakers


Why choose this monitor:

The BenQ EX2710 offers a good mixture of responsiveness and colour quality. The IPS-type panel delivers a rich and natural look to things, with just a touch of extension beyond sRGB. This provides just a hint of extra vibrancy, whilst retaining a faithful look to content created with this colour space in mind. Colour and gamma consistency is strong, meaning this richness and dark detail is well-maintained throughout the screen. The contrast is as expected for an IPS-type panel. Not exceptional and there’s ‘IPS glow’ to consider, but still a bit stronger than some IPS models in terms of static contrast. The brightness adjustment range is good, the OSD offers a range of innovative features (including well-implemented Low Blue Light settings) and the stand offers good flexibility. The monitor provides basic HDR10 support, but lacks a sufficiently generous colour gamut, backlight dimming precision or the stunning brightness required for a true HDR experience.

The monitor offers a solid 144Hz experience, with good pixel responsiveness and well-tuned and flexible pixel overdrive (AMA). Adaptive-Sync works well for both AMD (FreeSync Premium) and Nvidia (‘G-SYNC Compatible Mode’) users, removing tearing and stuttering from frame and refresh rate mismatches. An alternative is also provided – a ‘Blur Reduction’ strobe backlight setting, which is quite effective in performing its core function and better-implemented than some settings of this nature. The screen size and resolution combination won’t be for everyone, but it’s a sacrifice some will be willing to make given the overall price and performance. And indeed the extra immersion or being able to sit a bit further back compared to smaller screens of the resolution. If you like the sound of this monitor but would prefer something slightly cheaper and smaller with a bit of a tighter pixel density, we’d recommend the BenQ EX2510.

Further reading:

Our review

Manufacturer product page

BenQ EW3280U (32″ 60Hz IPS, 3840 x 2160)

 
BenQ EW3280U

BenQ EW3280U

 
Good for:

  • General desktop usage
  • Multi-tasking and text-heavy work (excellent desktop real-estate)
  • High resolution image editing and movie watching
  • Other colour-critical work within sRGB and DCI-P3 colour spaces (profiling advised)
  • High resolution casual PC gaming (60Hz max refresh rate)
  • Console gaming on 4K-capable consoles such as Xbox Series X and PS5


Panel used:

AU Optronics M320QAN02.1 (32″ AHVA IPS-type, 40 – 60Hz variable with Adaptive-Sync).

Screen surface:

Very light matte anti-glare screen surface, decent glare-handling with good maintenance of vibrancy and clarity.

Additional specifications:

  • 3840 x 2160 (‘4K’ UHD) resolution
  • PWM-free (flicker-free) Quantum Dot LED backlight (~DCI-P3 colour gamut)
  • 5ms grey to grey response time
  • 2 HDMI 2.0 ports, DP 1.4, USB-C (60W PD + DP Alt Mode) and 3.5mm headphone jack
  • Screen is tilt-only. 100 x 100mm VESA mounting supported, 2 x 2W stereo speakers plus 5W integrated subwoofer included


Why choose this monitor:

The BenQ EW3280U features a 32″ IPS-type panel with 3840 x 2160 (‘4K’ UHD) resolution. This provides an engrossing experience, with excellent clarity and detail for suitably high resolution content and crisp text output. It also provides an excellent level of desktop real-estate with lower levels of scaling (if any) required compared to smaller UHD screens. The IPS-type panel offers excellent colour consistency, which when combined with the generous colour gamut offers vibrant shade output throughout the screen. The flicker-free backlight and flexible and easily accessible Low Blue Light (LBL) settings help promote a restful viewing experience.

The monitor offers well-tuned pixel overdrive for a good 60Hz experience, including low input lag and fast pixel responses overall. AMD FreeSync is supported via Adaptive-Sync on the monitor, removing tearing and stuttering from frame and refresh rate mismatches on compatible AMD GPUs and systems. The screen is also VESA DisplayHDR 400 certified, providing a basic HDR experience – no contrast enhancement or local dimming, but appropriate use of the colour gamut and 10-bit colour output for enhanced tone mapping and shade variety. The monitor has a fairly unique (‘rustic’) aesthetic, which we found quite charming in person. Whilst the tilt-only stand won’t appeal to everyone, VESA mounting is supported and a few extra additions like integrated subwoofer and IR remote are nice little touches.

Further reading:

Our review

A post exploring alternatives and explaining our preference for this model

Manufacturer product page

Philips 328E1CA (31.5″ 60Hz curved VA, 3840 x 2160)

 
Philips 328E1CA

Philips 328E1CA

 
Good for:

  • General desktop usage
  • Multi-tasking and text-heavy work (excellent desktop real-estate)
  • High resolution movie watching
  • High resolution casual PC gaming (60Hz max refresh rate)
  • Console gaming on 4K-capable consoles such as Xbox Series X and PS5


Panel used:

TPV TPM315WR1-FP01.S (31.5″ curved Samsung SVA, 48 – 60Hz variable with Adaptive-Sync).

Screen surface:

Light matte anti-glare screen surface, good glare-handling without strong graininess to image.

Additional specifications:

  • 3840 x 2160 (‘4K’ UHD) resolution
  • PWM-free (flicker-free) WLED backlight (sRGB+ colour gamut)
  • 4ms grey to grey response time
  • 2 HDMI 2.0 ports, DP 1.2a, 3.5mm audio input and 3.5mm audio output
  • Screen is tilt-only. 100 x 100mm VESA mounting supported and 2 x 3W stereo speakers included


Why choose this monitor:

The Philips 328E1CA offers an immersive experience, with a curved 31.5″ screen. We found the curve easy to adapt to, drawing into the image a bit without feeling unnatural. The 3840 x 2160 (‘4K’ UHD) resolution offers a pleasing pixel density, with a screen of this size widely considered the sweet spot for the resolution. The high-contrast VA panel, some extension beyond the sRGB colour space and excellent colour consistency for the panel type help to deliver quite a vibrant image with pleasing shade variety.

The monitor also offers decent pixel responsiveness for the panel type and a low level of input lag. Although not marketed as a ‘gaming monitor’, it can certainly offer an enjoyable 60Hz experience for both PC and console gaming. Adaptive-Sync is also supported (FreeSync and ‘G-SYNC Compatible Mode’) to help smooth out drops in frame rate a bit below 60fps. Additional features of note includes a flicker-free backlight and variety of Low Blue Light (LBL) settings to further enhance viewing comfort.

Further reading:

Our review

A post summarising our thoughts on this model in the context of some alternatives

Manufacturer product page

LG 34GP83A (34″ 160Hz curved IPS, 3440 x 1440)

 
LG 34GP83A

LG 34GP83A

 
Good for:

  • General desktop usage including multi-tasking
  • PC gaming
  • Movie watching
  • Colour-critical work within sRGB and DCI-P3 colour spaces (profiling advised)


Panel used:

LG Display LM340UW6 (34″ curved Nano IPS, 48-160Hz variable with Adaptive-Sync).

Screen surface:

Light matte anti-glare with a smooth surface texture, providing decent glare handling whilst retaining strong vibrancy and clarity.

Additional specifications:

  • 3440 x 1440 resolution
  • PWM-free (flicker-free) WLED backlight (~DCI-P3 colour gamut)
  • 1ms grey to grey response time
  • DP 1.4, 2 HDMI 2.0 ports, 2 USB 3.0 ports and 3.5mm headphone jack
  • The stand offers tilt and height adjustment, VESA mounting also supported


Why choose this monitor:

The LG 34GP83A (34GP83A-B owing to the mainly black stand and rear) provides a vibrant and immersive gaming and general computing experience. As a member of the ‘UltraGear’ gaming monitor lineup, it is geared towards gamers but has a smart-looking design without too many ‘flashy’ elements. It uses a 34″ 3440 x 1440 (21:9 aspect ratio) Nano IPS panel with 1900R curve. This combines the numerous advantages of 21:9 with an extended colour gamut, very close to DCI-P3. This offers high levels of vibrancy, whilst the IPS panel keeps colours rich and consistent throughout the screen. The contrast is decent, largely as expected for the panel type, whilst the smooth and light matte screen surface provides a ‘clean’ look to the image without obvious graininess.

The monitor also provides a 160Hz refresh rate, a bump up from the 144Hz of the previous generation. Pixel responsiveness is improved as well, allowing the monitor to put the refresh rate to good use without strong overshoot or obvious trailing. Input lag is low and Adaptive-Sync is supported, including certification for both AMD FreeSync and Nvidia’s ‘G-SYNC Compatible Mode’. The monitor offers support for VESA DisplayHDR 400, allowing the colour gamut and 10-bit colour processing to be put to good use for HDR10 content. This is the lowest level of HDR that VESA will certify on a monitor and only sufficient to provide a basic experience without any enhancement to contrast.

Note this model is just a slightly cheaper refresh of the 34GN850 and isn’t available globally. We recommend considering the 34GN850 instead if the 34GP83A is unavailable in your region. The only apparent difference between the two, aside from price and availability, is a minor aesthetic change at the rear.

Further reading:

A thread exploring this model and its predecessors.

A thread covering some cheaper alternatives.

An article exploring the 3440 x 1440 resolution

Manufacturer product page


Note that this list is heavily condensed; look out for the ‘recommended badge’ in our reviews as well. You can sort our reviews by ‘recommended badge’ status and various other features in the review archive.