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Dell SE2717H with FHD IPS panel and FreeSync support

AMD’s FreeSync variable refresh rate technology is increasingly ubiquitous and due to its ease of implementation, far more so than Nvidia G-SYNC. On the outside, the Dell SE2717H looks quite like many other modern Dell monitors including the older SE2716H. The bezels are moderately thin all the way around, without any trickery going on in the press shots (what you see is what you get). The OSD (On Screen Display) control buttons are located to the left, on the underside of the bottom bezel. These are pressable and accompanied by a power button complete with Dell’s current favoured gentle white slit LED design – quite undistracting.

A familiar aesthetic

A familiar aesthetic


Internally, though, this model is very different to the SE2716H. The curved VA panel has been replaced by a flat IPS-type panel, with a 1920 x 1080 (Full HD) resolution and matte anti-glare finish to the screen surface. A 1000:1 static contrast is specified, alongside 178° horizontal and vertical viewing angles and the usual 6-bit + FRC colour processing. The refresh rate is 48 – 75Hz variable, with Adaptive-Sync. The monitor is therefore the manufacturer’s first to support AMD FreeSync for compatible GPUs, but you should be able to set it to 75Hz static as an Nvidia user as well. A 6ms grey to grey response time is specified, which may seem slow given what is specified on some models with this panel type but is really just a more realistic representation of what you can expect. A lot obviously depends on how well the pixel overdrive is implemented. A flicker-free WLED backlight is employed, suggesting DC dimming rather than PWM dimming. It’s nice to see that Dell have now turned to specifically market monitors as ‘flicker-free’ rather than leaving the user guessing as to whether it is or isn’t the case.

A glossy rear

A glossy rear


The included stand only offers tilt adjustment and attaches towards the bottom of the monitor. There are no VESA holes here. Inputs are restricted to HDMI 1.4a (with Adaptive-Sync) and VGA. It seems this is essentially a fairly stripped-down monitor, which could help lower costs, with the IPS panel and support for AMD FreeSync being key attractions. Further information can be found on certain regional Dell websites (such as their HK one, requires translation into English). We’ll consider a review if a sample can be provided and there’s sufficient demand.